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Artist's rendering, from NASA, of the European Space Agency's INTEGRAL spacecraft, in its in-flight configuration. The INTEGRAL mission, short for the "International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory", is focused on Gamma-ray astronomy, making use of a medium-sized Gamma-ray space observatory to make observations on astronomical Gamma-ray sources and collect data for study.

Artist’s rendering, from NASA, of the European Space Agency’s INTEGRAL spacecraft, in its in-flight configuration. The INTEGRAL mission, short for the “International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory”, is focused on Gamma-ray astronomy, making use of a medium-sized Gamma-ray space observatory to make observations on astronomical Gamma-ray sources and collect data for study.

The INTEGRAL gamma-ray telescope has recently detected a larger positronium annihilation signal towards the centre of the Milky Way than previously measured (Siegert et al. 2016). The origin of the positrons is unknown. They may come from a compact source such as the central black hole, from supernovae or their remnants, including pulsars.

In this project, you will attempt to detect positronium emission at radio frequencies through their Rydberg recombination lines. The data will come from the Parkes and ASKAP telescopes. The spatial distribution of this emission would give significant clues as to the origin of the positrons.

PDF PROJECT TIMELINE AND DESCRIPTION

This project will also be co-supervised by Roland Crocker (ANU).

Co-Supervisors

Dr Tobias Westmeier

Senior Research Fellow

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