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The first year of GLEAM observations, covering the whole Southern Sky. This is the first radio colour view of our universe

The first year of GLEAM observations, covering the whole Southern Sky. This is the first radio colour view of our universe

At the centre of every galaxy is thought to lie a supermassive black hole. While these black holes are billions of times more massive than the sun, they are still less than 1% of the mass of their host galaxy. Yet they are thought to play a key role in galaxy evolution across cosmic time affecting the star formation in their host and environment. Radio surveys are uniquely capable of tracing the evolution of these black holes and in particular the kinetic power they inject via relativistic jets into their immediate environments.

This survey will combine a suite of radio data from state-of-the-art radio observatories with one of the largest multi-wavelength surveys: GAlaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The combination of the different radio surveys will provide a unique probe of the black hole jet activity. The radio data will include:

  • The Murchison Widefiled Array (MWA) GLEAM survey (see below) covering 70-230 MHz
  • The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) EMU survey covering 0.7-1.8GHz
  • The Australian Telescope Compact Array GLASS survey covering 5.5-9.5 GHz

This position will involve learning how to reduce and analyse radio data from one or more of these surveys, as well as combining and modelling the radio data. Then when the radio data is combined with GAMA, the host galaxies of the supermassive black holes can be determined as well as the evolution of the whole population be determined.

This project is suited to a student with a strong interest in learning about radio astronomy and combining it with multi-wavelength data. A solid background in physics.

Co-Supervisors

Dr Minh Huynh

Adjunct Senior Research Fellow

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Dr Guillaume Drouart

Research Associate

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