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The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a low frequency (80-300 MHz) radio telescope operating in Western Australia and the only SKA_Low precursor telescope. One of the largest science programs for the MWA is the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, which has surveyed the entire visible sky for two years since the MWA commenced operations.

GLEAM has collected vast quantities of data. A large part of the first year of this data has been published as an extragalactic source catalogue. However, to produce this catalogue, all of the data was averaged together in time. The original data in full time resolution still remains to be investigated: hidden in these images are possible transient events, such as: flaring M-dwarf stars, reflective space junk, and potentially other undiscovered sources. There are also many astrophysical reasons for sources to change in brightness with time, such as scintillation from intervening plasma, and the flaring and dimming of distant black holes.

The project involves careful re-analysis of the original GLEAM data, using the combined catalogue as a reliable reference source. The student will search for objects which do not appear in the combined catalogue (transients), and identify their nature. There is also the potential to monitor the brightness of sources over time (variables). With approximately 7 million source measurements to search and correlate, organisation and clear thinking are crucial skills.

This project would suit a student with good programming skills who is willing to learn more and search a large dataset for potentially interesting events.

The degree (V) and significance (eta) of variability for a subset of sources that will be used in this work.

The degree (V) and significance (eta) of variability for a subset of sources that will be used in this work.

An example set of images, demonstrating a variable source. The source is detected only in the 2nd and 4th images.

An example set of images, demonstrating a variable source. The source is detected only in the 2nd and 4th images.

Co-Supervisor

Dr Paul Hancock

Early Career Research Fellow, Space Detective

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