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After the big-bang and recombination, the baryonic `regular’ matter content of the Universe was dominated by the first element on the period table – atomic hydrogen.  Over time, that material has been transformed into stars, galaxies, black holes, and the wealth of other different states of matter we see today.  Indeed today, neutral atomic hydrogen comprises only relatively small part of the total mass budget of the Universe, yet still exists in significant quantities in galaxies, and continues to play a driving role in their evolution.  This project will study the connections between neutral atomic hydrogen (measured in the radio with telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders), molecular material (measured through mm observations with the ALMA telescope in Chile and the ATCA in Australia) and the other major baryonic constituents of galaxies (traced through the rich multi wavelength imaging and spectroscopy of the GAMA survey).  How do the scaling relationships between these quantities evolve?  And most importantly what are the underlying physical processes that drive the evolution of material from one state to another? Results will be compared to the latest semi-analytic and hydrodynamic simulation runs to assist in this interpretation.

Multiwavelength images from GAMA (credit: GAMA team)

Multiwavelength images from GAMA (credit: GAMA team)

Associated Researchers

Prof Simon Driver

Winthrop Research Professor

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Dr Aaron Robotham

Senior Research Fellow

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