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Photographs relating to ICRAR's Research

Photography by Paul Bourke and Jonathan Knispel. Supported by WASP (UWA), iVEC, ICRAR, and CSIRO.The Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)

Located in the mid-west of Australia, the MRO is one of the most radio quiet places on Earth.  A perfect location for a radio observatory, the pristine radio quietness of the site is protected by its remote location and legislation.  The MRO is a candidate site for the Square Kilometre Array, with a decision on the final site to be made in 2012. 

Photography by Paul Bourke and Jonathan Knispel. Supported by WASP (UWA), iVEC, ICRAR, and CSIRO.The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)

CSIRO led ASKAP will be a world class radio telescope, with 36 radio dish antennas, each 12 metres across and 4 stories high.  Currently under construction in the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia, ASKAP is already providing astronomers with ground-breaking results.

Photography by Paul Bourke and Jonathan Knispel. Supported by WASP (UWA), iVEC, ICRAR, and CSIRO.The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA)

The Murchison Widefield Array is an innovative radio telescope, with no moving parts and very little impact on the environment.  Currently under construction in the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory, the MWA will consist of over 8000 individual antennas when completed.

Photographs taken at recent ICRAR events.

Image Credit: Jurgen LunsmannICRAR Launch

The International centre for Radio Astronomy Research or ICRAR had it’s offical launch in Perth on the 1st of September. This new centre is a joint venture between Curtin University of Technology and The University of Western Australia (UWA) and is sponsored by the State Government with strong collaborative support from partners such as CSIRO and iVEC.

Image Credit: Dr Megan Argo of ICRARIYA Sidewalk Astronomy

For 'Galilean Nights', an inititiative for the International Year of Astronomy, amateur and professional astronomers of Perth take to the streets so that  unsuspecting passers by can observe the wonders of the night sky first seen through a telescope by Galileo 400 years ago.

Image Credit: Paul Ricketts, The Centre for Learning Technology, UWAOut There! Exhibition

More than 500 science students from around the State got a privileged, behind-the-scenes introduction to the SKA project through the Out There! exhibition at The University of Western Australia in May this year.

Out There! featured an operational radio telescope, scale models of the SKA, a timeline ribbon highlighting what we can see now in space and how the SKA will enable astronomers to ‘look back in time' as well as Scitech's new portable Spacedome and a ‘World at Night' astrophotography display.

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Monday, 4 October, 2010 3:17 PM
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